Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Songs Gone Wrong
Songs Gone Wrong

Episode · 5 months ago

Interview w David Scotney from JANUS

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Bak and Drew interview David Scotney from JANUS and talk about basically everything: Old JANUS music, new JANUS music, what makes a good cover song, mental health, Missing And Murdered Indigenous Women, and good pizza.

Whatever you do immediately after listening to this, make sure it's checking out JANUS and their music. Click here to check them out on Spotify.  

You can follow David on Instagram here: @davidscotney

You can follow JANUS on Instagram here: @janusband

Last but not least, you can find them on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/janusband

As for us:

Website: Songsgonewrong.com

Twitter: @SongsGone

IG: @SongsGone

Email: sgwpodcast@gmail.com  

Hey every one and welcome the songsgone wrong, but be along with you. The fans decide if these hit songs got itright or did those songs go wrong on one of your host re Zaman and joiningme, as always, is the marvelous back batons, but we are not alone. Today wehave a great guess, a wonderful person and just all around talented musician.We have David Scotney joining us from the band genus and if you haven'tchecked them out, I highly recommend you listen to them. I've been listeningto them for over ten years now and their stuff is awesome and they havesome new things coming out soon. So we had a great interview with him. So whydon't we just dig right into that interview with David Scotney from Janis.I I'll be honest. I I'm kind of a big fan I'll try not to to fan boy too muchover here, so yeah, first of yeah. I, like I said thanks again for coming onour show, so I've personally I've been following you guys, since I would sayred right return that came out and what two thousand and nine I think it wasyeah. The last album I have- and maybe you can help me pronounce this right.Is it no sores? Am I pronouncing that not aris? Okay boy? I was not evenclose to M. Well it. It makes two of us that havenot studied Latin. So it's a dead language. So you get a pathon that all right, I'll, take it I'll. Take it yeah and I think that's thelast album you got the less full album. You guys have had out. I've been kindof stalking you guys on Potifer. If you have new music coming out and it waslike a little over a year ago or so you guys released a single that cover ofdrive and then you guys had stolen sisters, which we we'll talk more aboutthose in the little bit. But I like to start off with kind of talking aboutwhat can we expect from from human from Janice? In Two thousand and twenty onesure S- I'm really really excited about thisyear, because we owe the original line up an put out.Those two records broke up after Knox, Aras and then kind of went our separateways for a while. I took a break from the music industry and got into kind ofthe pizza world which I have. I still have an obsession with me about southpizza and just it's going on ten years now thatI'm still certifiable clinically obsessed with me, a pulp soute to theart form the craft. Is it the Rick Oven? Is it the brick of an kind of thing?It's it's yeah we've got wit, burning, stone, ovens that came from Italy tofan a Fars, an amazing family. It's been making those ovens for a hundredsof years wowly over a hundred years, and I could bore you guys with pizzatalk for hours, but I'll stick to the topic. Yeah Janet. We, we kind of, went ourseparate ways and then I would say a couple of years ago. I got reallyinspired to get back into music with a twist on Genis to kind of start,getting into putting songs out for philanthropical reasons and to raiseraise awareness about causes that I was passionate about. The drive single wasone that hit close to home. For me, I'm just supporting a family member with bypolar disorder and and that I just heard that song a d and actuallystudied the lyrics and just realized that it was completelyabout mental health and then, once I realized that I saw the originalvideo, I got inspired to kind of rock that song up a little bit and then kindof re imagined it with some heavier guitars and believe it or not. It's the exact samekey and PM is the original, just driving, leaning into those six teethnotes it feels faster. It feels more...

...modern cause it it yeah. I thanks. Iloving that video and it was a good excuse for me to get backinto shape and I lost twenty pounds and got really fit and healthy and C, andthen we worked. And then I worked on stolen sisters, kind of by myself, so Ihad written that song played all the the instruments and then had an amazingopportunity. Work with David Bendeth who's, just a phenomenal producer. Heproduced paramour and breaking Benjamin and Oh wow, he's out in New York, andhe is famous infamous for being one of the toughest music producers to workwith on the planet, and it's there's a really good reason. Why I, as thatreputation, I spent a week with him- and I got my face- just melted andkicked in my sin I was put through. They call it Benda boot camp and theycall it that for a reason, because he he runs you like a race horse. Hereally does squeeze the absolute best out of you S and it was. It was a lifechanging week of my life and a kind of the interesting thing between KnockSaris and present day. So Mike Transkei or Ogata players get all of the songwriting on those two records. I really just was a singer and a lyricist, so Iwrote a lot of melodies, but I didn't write any of that music. So in betweenKnox Arason, now I partnered up with a or took somelessons from just a music theory Guru who kind of schooled me on song.Writing, and basically, I would say in about in about a two hour session kindof really introduced me to what musical keys were all about song, writing indifferent keys and and then kind of essentially open my eyes and ears tobeing able to write music in net in any any style that I want any sortof instrumentation and then I kind ofschooled myself on Middie instruments and got into drum programming, piano, keys, strings instruments. Youname it so I'm able to kind of assent by writing and and and put togetheranything that comes to my head now currently, which is, which is anamazing kind of thing, and I kind of developed it out of Nisette. Theexciting part, though, is since when I released stolen sisters, both Johnny Al and Mike got kind of reenergized, the reinspired and reconnected with me super excited theywere. They were stoked about that song in that video and- and thenwe've been talking ever since, and recently I would say in the last sixmonths, Mike Trans, you know, I started trading parts again he's sending memusic files from Portland Oregon. We did a rehearsal about a year alittle over a year ago to try and put together a reunion show in Chicagowhich now that coid is kind of starting the wind down we're starting talksabout getting that reunion show put together, and we've got probably sixsix to seven songs in different states of development forthe next record. So will you stay in the Midwest? I know that you do kind ofa lot of your tours or around that yeah. So I am. My home base is out ofWisconsin, so lake in Eva Wisconsins, where I currently live, Johnny's andall are both still in Chicago and Mike, is currently in Portland. So I think Mike's going to travel backto Chicago at some point soon here and we're going to get into the rehearsalspace and start working on on the live show. I don't think we're planning ontouring any time soon, but I do think that we all are really spoke aboutgetting a reunion show together in Chicago and I'm mainly super spoked andfocused on writing and recording a new record. So that's kind of the the stated union andthen Jake Port Corton Kirchner he's a drummer who's now joined a band called,let bound which is phenomenal. If you...

...haven't seen let down or heard aboutthem, they blake is absolutely blown up on tick, Tock and- and I think he's gota half a million followers now on here. He's just he's blown up, jakes plaindrums with him, but he's also still playing on some of the songs that I'vewritten and recorded my so so the new record will probably have a the there's,a song called Blue Stars, a song called high ground that are pretty much done.Rashid Russie, Thomas from non point played guitar. Oh ow, okay, song calledhigh ground and it's a it's a monster of a tune. It's really heavy. It'spretty mean I was actually working on some music last night. I've got a cover cover ofbring me the horizon song culled, sleepwalking, okay, I kind of reimagine with keyboards, and I sing it in Okola's super trippy and kind of de Tones creepy with lots of delay andvoices and stuff so yeah, that's kind of a very high level state of the unionwith Janis. There is a new song that does not have a title yet that it'scompletely done. It's getting ready to be mixed, it's one that Mike wrote andthen actually he and I kind of Co rode pieces of it and Johnny is going toplay on it. I was Goin to play on it and we're going to release that single,hopefully in July, okay and then, when we release that new single we'reactually going to drop armor, which is our our record, that we self releasedself produced before Red Right, return: okay, nice and if you haven't heard itarmor or seen it out there. It's not on any of the digital channels, yet I think it's been, Ithink pieces of it are out there just on yout or or maybe shared files orwhatever. But it's an awesome record. We did with many Sanchez, you did a lotof fallow stuff and it's a real edgy cool record, it's kind of where I firstdiscovered. I could screen that kind of creepy blood, curdling melt, yourear,dome screen, there's a lot of it on that record and it's a it's a reallycool ig record that we've been waiting to drop for several years and justholding off for an excuse to drop that record on a new single. That seems likethe perfect opportunity to do that. I, when Red Right Return, came out andthen I started getting into you guys. I tried. I knew you guys had a couplealbums before that and I just couldn't get my hands on it. So I'm lookingforward to to listening to that armor armor is definitely the one that I'mproud of anything before that. I'm trying not to let you get a home o fairenough to live, not not pleasing to the years and my opinion, that is not age.Well put it that way, fair enough, all right! So now, so let's go back alittle bit going back to reriteing real quick. So one of your hits right, whichis, I think, how initial how I found you guys. My friend was the one whokind of pointed me in your direction. After listening to I sor and once I heard that I was like, let meget the album and I mean six letters sent. I absolutely love that song sucha great in track. The whole album is good, but I saw like my understandingis that song is kind of like the struggle with mental health. If I'm notmistaken, get me honest there is that right. You know, I would say yes, yes,and no yes, in a sense that it's really it's really just about that songprobably summarizes our state of mind when we were a baby band trying to getsigned. Okay, because we were working with different producers and managersand people that were were trying to trying to that we're interested insigning the band, but they hadn't heard a heard, a quote: Unquote single andevery single band is trying to get signed. The the record labels that wantto sign them won't sign them unless they hear what's called a quote,unquote single, so we in ended up and that can really mess with your headwhen you're an artist. You know you end up, writing songs that you think people want to hear that you think is aquote. Unquote single and you start to...

...kind of lose yourself and lose youridentity in terms of what you know. Why you're right by youright, songs? And it's really when you when you stop trying to please peopleand you just focus on what gets you off and what you're inspired about, and we wrote that song. You know. Inever thought in a million ears that I could scream all the way through achorus and and expect people to call it a single.And so we kind of did that, as as like an Fu to the whole process of trendingthe whole like we're just going to go out on our own and but the kind ofmusic out that we want and if, if the world likes it great, if not, we careless, because we were just trying to be true to ourselves. So, and I think thatif you, you know, that's somthing this in a nutshell that pre course reallysums it up. You know just looking in the mirror if, ifyou're not true to yourself and you pretending to be someone else for toolong, you know you're not going to like what you see in that mirror. Yeah, it'sreally going to you're going to become something that you're not proud ofyou're, going to be a person that you're not happy with, and that's it'sjust that songs really just about being kind of true to your your heart.Essentially Nice kind of the the subtle art of not giving a fuck, basicallyyeah yeah, I'm trying to just be the best you that's inside and not letpeople influence your are green. What you want to do in life yeah now alsothe album cover I've noticed your album covers that. I have seen right Retreta,then Knox Aris were unique and interesting. Now the one with red rightreturn. That kind of had this almost like A. I guess, like a rush orlike kind of like a communist ish like Vera, how? How did you come up with thedesign for that sure? So it was really so. I actually studied painting atMaryland Institute College of Aran Design, okay in Baltimore, so I was in the the only thing that I was reallygood at when I was a kid and young was was art and painting, it was a visualartist and I was kind of a C student B Plus C student, and so it just seemed to make sense forme to lean into what I was good at. The time is, is painting in art, and- andso I got into the Russian constructive period of ourokay of that tens war poster propaganda that just had a cool graphic style toit in a look, and then we kind of leaned into that that kind of suit ofarmor per se, because I just like the irony about the fact that those songson that record are so personal yeah in such an introspective subject matter ina lot of those songs that it just seems funny and almost ironic to put a wholeextroverted. You know kind of strong militant looking persona around theuniforms that we wore the art work, because it was just completely theopposite of what the actual songs were about yeah. So it I just seemed kind ofkind of fun, and then I got into that particular period of or just because ofthe t e t e, just the look of it, the color scheme there was really no meaning orsignificance behind the the actual period at the actual country, okay,Russia or or that particular kind of time period nothing other than just we like thelook of that Russian constructive is art, work and then that's kind of it.What influence and then, when I ended up doing was I I ended up drawing a lot of that stuffin illustrator. A dobe illustrator. Just did all the illustration work andthen I started grabbing old prenounce of different the front back of different monetary notes, Russian monetary notes and juststarted folding, those in as overlays and textures, and then scraping and grinning up like all theedges and tried to kind of age it...

...it kind of age that art work. So it wasa we, the inside of that record. There is a poster of us in that same illustration style. Idon't know if you've ever seen that picture not the inside part. Now youknow I should I'm going to pout post that to instar. Maybe I'll do it latertoday, because there's a band poster of us,that's in that was inside the CD. That's, how old that that record is I and the band poster is an illustrationthat I did and I traced over. I Co compositive, a bunch of photographs ofus that we shot with a photographer, and then I spent probably twelve hourstracing each one of our figures and junks and shadings and built thatposter into what it was. I mean it was a huge labor of jest. I swore to myselflike never doing that again after I that Amistat on it was just my numbing,gratuitous, tedious, listerine computer work that age me in that twelve hours. That sounds like my Halloween outfits,I spend over a forty fifty hours on my hellonge really yeah dude you got I gotto you got to send me a set o N. Send me a link we, ah we do with the familyevery year and a yeah I spent. I did a spaceship one. I think it was a hundredhours. Oh my God. I start in September. Oh my God. I know I I got one other buddy who'ssuper into Halloween. He goes because nuts and intentionally don't take mykids near his house, the line yeah top in each year. I got to toss it everytime. I'm like God, then me yeah, send me a link. U is the name that on Insaraor face book I'll put it together, yeah I'll, do a watch collage of all allhome together. I have that to send me a link a definitely so so noxis that arandom note about that by the way, speaking of Russia. So I got that albumnot too long before I actually wound up taking a trip to Russia. It was in twothousand and twelve and as we're on the it's like a nine hour flight, the onesong I was jamming to was in flames, which is probably not the best song tolisten to on a nine hour, plane ride Moscow, so ye. That's so much. I likethe dollie o. This album is great that the cover for that one too, is almostearly appropriate for the past year and a half but yeah that album absolutely rocks and nowmoving to drive right so a question there than he talked about before, likewhy you wanted to do that song and of all the songs to cover right. Likethat's, that's a it's, a great song on its own right. The original is, is agreat song by the cars. Is there, do you think, there's any like addedpressure on you to cover a song, that's already like good on it on, and Ithought your cover was fantastic by the way, absolutely loved it. But do youthink there's like any extra pressure on you to cover a song? That's alreadya massive hit. So it's a great question and I would sayyes, so the version that I released of thatcover was probably the third rendition that I had done of that song. Okay andI had I had kind of fallen on my face two or three times before I landed onthat interpretation of the song, and just because you know, whenever you doa cover, I'm working on a bringing no Erizein cover that there's they'resingle sleep walking, which is just in screaming non stop throughout thatentire track, and you know, I think that I think any artist, big or famousor small, like you're, going to you're going to do a cover songe unless you'rea tribute fan and you're trying to...

...sound exactly like them. I think yougot the responsibility of putting your own spin on it, making it feel likeit's your own and as soon as I had rocked up the guitars, and I duginto that sixteenth note or eight note pattern. I I was like, and then I put that TrimGuitar in there that Tremolo kind of like staccato guitar in there that'swhat it really started to take on its own, its own kind of vibe and then, assoon as I got into the verses, I must have done a hundred takes of thoseverses and I would sing it and I'd be like it sounds like I'm seeing a coverand then I just kept turning my headphones down and singing it quieterand quieter and quieter, and so I was just like I'm going to sing this asquiet as I possibly can and whisper it almost and that's when those versesstarted to really find their own kind of sound, and it felt different enoughand ownable enough that I was like yeah. This is. I thinkthis is going to work now. What is the process? I always thought about this,like what is the process of the copyright and having that song andactually performing it and putting out as a single? How does that process worksure? So, ultimately, what ends up happening is the he. Thewriter of the song will still get their royalties paid out to them so, but Iget performance right because I had performed it. So that's how that splits-and you know you register with whateversong writing. You Know Pub Publishing Company you're with and then you knowthe the cars are collecting. Whatever writing credits on that, and so it'sthat it's pretty straight forward. Pretty much. Anyone can can cover asong and as long as you don't try to publish it and can claim that you wroteit you're not going to get in in trouble. Okay, nice and you said so.The proceeds of that went to help. Was it a health support, bipolar disorder,research yeah. So we worked. Actually, I ended up working with so we mentioned the Jed Foundation inthe video, but we ended up doing a live benefit. A RELEASE PARTY AT OAK fire,my pizza place in Lake Teneva, shut down the second floor. I have a hugesound system in that place and then Jake and I performed the song a D andDid a fundraiser for a local nonprofit health clinic called open arms. Okayand we raise just over four thousanddollars for them, my through through the money that that was that that wegenerated, which was just awesome and it went, it really went to help pay for a dollar for every for every dollarthat we raise pace for ten dollars worth medicine. So, if you think aboutme the numbers there, we made a huge impact with that yeah. Now, that'sgreat, so it's yeah, we were excited to do it and open arms was there at theevent they were. They were really thrilled and particularly to be able to support themental health arm of that organization, because it open armed services, peopleadder below the poverty level that qualified for basically for freemedical services that they provide Oso. They live and breed and die off oftheir their donations as as a foundation. So every dollar helps that organization.That's great! That's a good! That's a good amount! So to help donates, that'sdefinitely something to be proud of for sure, and we we did an episode. I thinkI was back in the fall time. We talked about mental health and we actually thesong that usual. What we do is we talk about like a song and we kind of Dickinto the lyrics I feel like, or the title of our show songs gone wrong.That feels a little bit harsh like we're. We're not we're not going we're,not total assholes over here. You know we we're just like music nerds, well, a lot of stories about songs goingwrong, so we can we get into that,...

...but we don't like tell you don't mean II've always liked to. You know, dig into the lyrics a lot and I feel, likeI've, been doing that a lot of were the past year and then one of the songs wediscussed about mental health was stressed out from twenty one pilots.I've Er really been getting into those guys because their lyrics are so lard,it's pretty intense how great they put their lyrics together, and you know wetalked about anxiety and mental health in general. With Co video, there was ahuge uptick in depression and anxiety, and there there was. We found astatistic in Morbidity and mortality. Weekly, which, by the way thatpublication sounds like a lot of fun, I don't know why you call a Magato, bittyand mortality weekly like who wants to read about that every week anyway, but they were saying that anxiety anddepression rose about forty one point: five percent during Ovid. So it's Ifeel like it's one of those things that's kind of everywhere. You knowbasically half half the country is you know I dealing with it in one fast oranother, but one thing that I saw that really stuck with me was as abouttwelve and a half percent of adults said they needed, but did not receivecounseling. So I'm not sure how much of that was like maybe lack ofavailability or counseling, or maybe the stigma around county. But how doyou think they can break down or help break down that stigma? You know abouttalking about mental health. You know it's it's a great question and I I I can only really speak to what Ipersonally try to do to address it, and that was the the best way that I couldkind of help was to pour my passion and energy into art and music. So I I madethat that video for that drive song to try and get people inspired to open upand talk about it and if nothing else, you know I wanted towhen I started to learn more about pd by polar sort of. I started reading.Just all of these facts and statistics that I had no idea about, and you know when you try to support afamily member with severe by polar disorder. You you know my family was not prepared,we're not educated, not armed, and it's still a challenge and it can be misinterpreted, and you knowmisdirected hostility. You know it can be interpreted as just playinghostility. So what I tried to do was just put stuff that I found intriguing or interest saying that Ididn't know about into the video so that people who would watch the videowould be like. Oh, I didn't know that or oh that I found that interesting andI will say that putting that song out, I was able to play it for a couple differentorganizations. We aired the video at the event I met. We did an PR interview in Madison withdiscussing kind of mental health and talking about it and what I found sofascinating. Is that what I find fascinates every time, I've talked tosomebody about that video for about that song, even even on even at NP andwent, and we did an interview and then, as soon as the interview was done, thewoman was walking me out of the building and she said- and this happensto me every single time that song comes up, or somebody watches that video, sothat that person or somebody will pull me aside, go you know what I know,somebody that that struggled with it for yeah my uncle committed suicide andwere pretty sure he had it is like every single person pulls me aside, akind of whispers in my ear that Yeah Yeah. I got this person that I know, orI struggle with that and just the fact that they'recomfortable enough to even just whisper it I feel like, is a bay step inprogress right rather yeah, keeping it inside they're at least talking aboutit. Maybe that person...

...goes home and talks to to someone elseabout it or shares the song. So I think that that is, you know if, ifwe can get people listening to art or inspiring people to ten to read, lyricsget involved, or even you know, or I decided to hit the les hit people overthe head with a hammer and just put actual statistics right in their pensabout about mental health in that video. So that's all that's all. I really think that you know from my perspective what Ithink can kind of help jump start the conversation. I think that if I thinkit's, the media and and government agencies are addressingit and Maye mental health, part of and the education system, making mentalhealth just as important as as Diet and other health and physical activity. Youknow we're taught as as kids about you know, protein vegetables and healthydiet. I think that it really should be part of the curriculum to talk aboutmental health and Cope mechanisms, and I would say, asthe one thing that my kids are: There's no formal training or structure. Youknow in there an when they're when they're in school. You know my sonexperienced and bullying and had no skills to manage stress frustrationyeah. You know- and it's really up to US- tokind of wing it at home to really coach him a d and then teaching what what fewskills we have so and exercises. It's always been for methat the way to take to go aemy mind you know, so you look like you're instill in good shape. Oh Yeah, I actually I has a house how's the racketball game. I played racket ball a handful of times,but I'm more into running and then working out and then my wife's super inthe fitness and he went to college for nutrition to fitness and she's she's anominal shape, but I'm almost back to my my college weight. It hundred andsixty eight I'm about five eleven. So that's really where I'm working towardsit. Probably A at about five pounds to go. My son, I just have been doing tonsof push ups free weights in a lot ofcardio, just lots and lots of running and that's really kind of the and thenI'm really into Berbeus, because sorden Wisconsin, you can't go outside whenit's twenty yellow and just really doing tons and tons ofBerbeese as well as running inside in my wife superintends. Now, that's likea te yeah, so she's buying me a set of way to jump up, so I'm excited to kindof try it she kind of presented to me all the like. You can run for thirtyminutes and burn these to galeries, or you can do fifteen minutes of this wayto jump, rope and burn double double o Tories in line, and I watch her, do itand it looks easy M. my eight year old daughters got a little jump rope. Shejumps right around with her yeah. I'm sure, I'm sure to way to jump up inBurkey's will definitely keep you guys warm up there and I, but yeah exercise is huge. I mean Istarted working out because I was like kind of dealing with some anxiety overthe the pandemic and stuff and I feel like starting in January I got aworkout plan, you know a diet plan and everything else and I've been stickingto an actually this whole year, which is something I've never done socongressman thanks yeah and it definitely helps. I mean they also saythat you know a good workout or a good run is about as effective, if not moreeffective than taking like medication for anxiety. So it's actually betterthan taking like a gasolier or something else. So I try towater. Do that, but yeah I mean and...

...also when you think about it right. Youknow, I think, when it comes to exercise, you know, don't think aboutdoing the work. You know because it does kick your, but that's the point ofit, but I know if anybody's ever worked out before you know you usually rightafterwards you might be a little guest, but you usually feel awesome afterwardsand I feel like if you're trying to Oh yeah start out. You know maybe justfocus on that's like I know what I'm done, I'm going to feel awesomeafterwards, so I think that's a good way to kind of keep things going, but yeah andfor longevity to you know, there's Oh yeah, there's a guy that I startedfollowing on Instar his name David Sinclair, he's yeah, my harberprofessor he's basically trying to cure n with his he's. Basically, there's amazing things:it's like the wild west in terms of of combating age, ages m! It's now I guessclassified as a disease, that's what he's driving for yeah yeah, which isnuts, but he talks a lot about how you know exercises literally the key tokind of turning back the clock. Yeah. I makes well physically make you younger.It's pretty wild. Just at a sell, your cellular biological level. Whatexercise can really do for you? You know your sharpness of mind as well asjust your you're. It can literally rewing your biological kind of ageclock I S. Yes, Oh yeah, yeah I've listened to sinclair on. I think itmight have been Rogan and it might have been. I can't think of his name. He does alot of like triath lines and Iron Mans. I can't think of this name, but it wasinteresting listening to Claire because he found like some kind of molecule orsomething like that. I think he says he was you know they figured it out likein and mice, and I guess there trot work on it with with humans too, andit's when you think about it. It's like wow that actually makes a lot of sense,but it's crazy to like how just medicine and we're just getting moregranular and really down in there and trying to figure things out. So it's definitely interesting. I think,there's literally one gene or a couple gens that they identified that literally flip a switch yeah. Somepoint in your biology and just tell yourself start dying: It's pretty wild.You know it's Nice. There they're, like they're, getting close to being able tojust tell that Jean to f off right, yeah, an think in terms of mice. Theywere able to regenerate, I guess in a blind, Mut mouses, regenerated, opticnerve and a d be able to kind of get the mouse to seeing it just yeah, justwild, Oh yeah, that that opens up a lot of doors for other treatments on otherthings too. So it's yeah definitely interesting to see like where thingsfor Gress an there's, my wife and I we watch PPE, we're nerds, but there's athere's something I think it's called like the history of living longer orsomething like that. It's like a multi part series, and it's reallyinteresting to like seeing like how things, even with the coved vaccineright like how they essentially were like it's almost like the UPRAORuploading m into our bodies- and I was like, if you see these proteins withthese particular spikes on them. Here's what you need to do to fight them andthen, when it sees it, it fights it as opposed to, like the old method of youknow, creating a vaccine. So it's really interesting to see where thingsgo with, we'll see man now getting away from from mental health and kind ofgoing to stolen sisters right, so that came out early last year, early twothousand and twenty, and my understanding is that is about missingand murdered. Indigenous women. Correct. Is that but that's about yeah yeahthere's one of my buddies online who's. Also James Fan, I justwas literally posted. I think a face book post just asking people. There wasany particular charity or organization or cause that they were passionateabout because I'm working on more music and this guy sent me a link to anarticle about the about kind of that crisis among the indigenous population,and I was just blown away by. I just moved to tears by this this articleabout what what's happening in in kind...

...of the the challenges for a lot ofthese families, in terms of trying to pursue justice trying to find findthese people that are that have gone missing and- and I just wanted to shinea light on it and the song literally, the court wrote itself as soon as Iread that article and I was like I got to build a song around this. It took mea year to get that song produced done and the video shot, because I reallyreally wanted to find a native American organization that partner with me andhelp me get it right, yeah, just because not being part of that culture, I didn't. I was very, very consciousand careful about the lyrics speaking on that subject matter involving anyimagery, and I really wanted to make sure I had the blessing of someone partof that culture, and I found this woman in Neeta Lu, Casey, he's just doingroundbacked for sovereign bodies, institute she's, probably the mostprominent national figure. Speaking on that issue and actually doing somethingabout it. He's built an incredible database of of missing and murden did DIS, women andgirls, and she was kind enough to work with meless. The lyrics provide statistics from her database that made it intothat video and she reached out to indigenous families and asked forphotographs of their their missing to including a video which is blown awayby Oh yeah. So I got. I got these photographs emailed me and I printedthem out and then worked with gray spot is the company that shot the video thatwent into their studio and then laid all these photographs out on the tableand shot the photographs with with the video camera, and it was so. It was a long process andand involved and- and we were able to raise a couple thousand dollars for herinstitute, which I was really grate before and so yeah it was. That was anamazing kind of experience and journey and then to be able to work on thatsong. With David Bendeth in New York, I actually played the same Gibson lessPaul Baritone Guitar, that Ben Burnley played on a lot onto thebrake Benjamin records. Oh wow kind of a weird thrill- that's awesome, sumsyeah. I was able to play that guitar on that track and then and then David got kind of inspiredabout. You know I told him what the song wasabout. He was intrigued. He agreed to work with me Jake and I drove out thereand we posted a picture of an artist that that did the art work for thatcover Yep. Those are really nice tar to yeah and she the artist. I can'tremember me now and I'm going to kick myself, but I found that art work online Ireached out to the artist is said: Hey can I use this for this song and shewas like absolutely and then I printed out that picture. I believe that thetitle that pains felt vanished and I hung that picture up in the studio, theentire time we were working so that David is engineer. Brian Robins, justphenomenal Jake and myself were just reminded of why we are doing what we'redoing yeah drop that old process. So it was, it was cool, very, very movingexperience. At the same time, you know, I think it helped, because David justputs you through the grinder and he's got incredibly high expectations andthe Babet the crap out of you. She No that you wake up and keep coming backfrom Mogar Nice. I call him the professor of today's birthday. Actually,I wished him happy birthday on his Facebo Online, Nice. So being a rockstar, you never grew your hair long. I had long hair, yeah you're, just smitersuper curly, a super carly and everybody's told me. I look like DavinRossdale, so I cut it yeah I got the fresh nice fade going toyeah, I got the the shape and fnally...

...was able to grow some face her so yeah, it's weird, because I I saw a statistic somewhere that aroundfour thousand cases of missing and murdered and digious women and girlshave been documented us and Canada, which is it's terrible, and I feel like ingeneral, how we you've treated natives here in America. It's it's deplorableright, a lot of people I like I'm like a big history, nerd and I love readingup on history and a lot of people when you look back at History Y. Obviously,like Oh Andrew Jackson's, a hero, you know old, I feel like old Hickory waspretty much a jerk off. You know and Oh yeah, basically on a place. Oh YeahYeah. He stole land from people in the South East and he was like. Oh here, here's the contract, I'll sime.You guys we're going to take this. You guys you guys move west and then that'sthat's where your land is and then when they move out West, there's platosettlers already there and they're like no. No, it's not here, it's actuallyfurther out west and basically he kept moving and moving. Hence the trail oftears, which I feel like totally got glossed over in history, class and andbasically they're like you know, and I remember learning in schools like OhAndrew Jackson, is a great war hero, a tough guy. He acquired a lot of landfor United States, chill tears and then now on the MartianBurin and his you know weird fucking hair cuts. So it's just weird. You know how a lotof things get glossed over like that. So that's really neat that you, youknow, brought some attention to that. So that was really awesome. Yeah I meanthere's, there's so much to be done there and it's o Yeah Anita's, justmaking some, I think, she's really making progress. He actually is atracker to so when she as running the institute, you will actually takebreaks. There was a time period where she was just gone for a couple months.I couldn't get a hold of her she's, like I'm going to be tracking with mypartner. I went where they're actually going out to find these women and girlsand she's so she's, just a huge inspiration and doing powerful,powerful work in that space. But you know that the biggest crime tragediesyou know, but the tribal member. You know the e a lot of the R, the kids andyoung folks are just like us. They go to college. They they you know, but ifthey are tribal member and let's say something happens to them in in Newark,New Jersey right and they go missing or they get breaked in an alley orsomething the the local jurisdiction they, the localpolice. Even the state police can't do anything. It becomes it's instantly, afederal jurisdiction matter, a lot of times it just gets lost in the secondverse of that Song is really all about the struggle just trying to get throughthe red tape and the politics and just the the daisical mess that gets made.You know in the lack of attention from local and state law enforcementand and then also mired and just hypocrisy and lost in the shuffle atthe federal level. So yeah it really isn't, isn't any good structure orprostrating place to for these women and girls, girls, O ed to be found oror justice served, and most of what I discovered, I thought that it was ahuman traffic thing crisis. It really is not it's all. The data andstatistics lean heavily into just violence, an women, murder and violence.So educating, educating the male population is reallythere's a there's. An organization called the Buffalo Project. That'sreally addressing that side of the trying to get to the route causitt. SoI wish there's more. I could do and it's tough when you're, not part ofthat that community or culture yeah there were a lot of organizations. Thatsaid no, I would not work with me on this project that he, you know forwhatever reason interesing. So it was very challenging very tough for me toto try and strike a common ground with someone in the community. That wouldeven allow me or trust me enough to even talk to me yeah. So it was. I waschallenging. You know you, you would...

...think you're trying to give money to anorganization they would, they would instantly say yes, but it a one not yeaway, taking that in that community yeah. It's that culture and community youknow is it is a tight knit community and and, like you said, there's been alot that they've had a deal with an strol, yeah yeah and the injustices arethe list of a mile on. So yeah, absolutely a D and to your point beforeis- are like the violence towards them. I had some notes here: Bete, onethousand nine hundred and eighty and two thousand and twelve indigenouswomen and girls represented sixteen percent of all female homicides inCanada, while only making up four percent of the female population. Sothose numbers are like massively disproportionate, so yeah yeah inCanada. It's a huge problem in Canada and I feel like the new prime minister.There is trying to make difference on that. I don't know much regarding specifics of what he's doing,but I know it's at least beenbrought up andthere's some attention being paid to it. Yeah Cole last cushion I have here Dave.So what's the next cause you're going to be working for or working along with,so it's interesting, the the Janus like the old line up of Dennis. Isn't they don't necessarily share mysingular kind of passion for putting songs out for causes, so I'm kind of since I'm kind of the last standingmember of Janis kind of the original founder of the band. I I'm still kind of in an autonomousposition where I'm able to still make some songs with Jake as a duo and putout some Danish tracks that are strictly mental health related there'ssome of Blue Stars that I worked on it's done and Chris Granger, who mixesall of our stuff Ted Jenson Masters. It they're, both inNashville, he's working on the final mixture bluestars that one is really about loose star families which our familiesthat have active service members. Okay, I thought in the military yea my momwas in the army for thirty thirty years fires, and so I was a we were Blue Starfamily in. I feel like there's, not there's a lotof work out there, a lot of songs. You know I feel, like five finger: DeathPunches cornered the market on sons for the military, jute, the actual servicemembers out there and yeah, but I don't think that there's a lot ofpeople telling the story or supporting the families. You know that that areour state side trying to sport, service members that are deployed yeah- and Iknow what that's like you know. My mom find on a plane to Germany when I was when I was really young and I'll, neverforget the day that she left when and she spent nine years over there. Oh WowI've visited a couple times, but it's a long time. She was deployed yeah.She was deployed there, and so you know I know what that feeling is like to toto kind of go through that separation deal with that distance and in my struggle, was nothingcompared to what families that you know. A wife is stateside with kids and theirhusbands, a boys, that's a whole nother level of sacrifice, and so I reallylike the idea of shining light on that and some of the statistics involved andhopefully we'll get to make a video for that song to so yeah. That's a that's,probably the next philantrophic kind of mission song and then the newest songthat that we're going to release is really it's again, probably more aboutmental health and and even probably substance of use tookay. I know there's there's no lack of of that in the music world or business.You know tourments traveling, you see a lot of yeah a lot of that, and so therewas a cathartic kind of song that we wrote what the origins ofthe song pieces of the song. We wrote pretty much after right right aroundwhen we were breaking up: okay, just...

...kind of a reaction, reflection of thatthat life on the road and experiencing kind of the stressing of the travelingand what not. And so, but we don't. We don't have a title for the song. It'sdone all the lyrics are done, and I don't know why I haven't. I picked thetitle for it, but but yeah that song is that's, probably going to be that thatwill be the first single that we release, and so a handful of thesesongs with the old genis line up will not be tied to any causes. Okay,they're just simply kind of Jani songs that the original line up worked on andthen there's going to be a handful of songs that Jake and I are going to workon on the new record that will be tied to causes and what not I just will befocused on that. So it's a little little bit of a Hodge podge Nice. Nowthat sounds great, so yeah, I'm looking forward to that when it comes out thatbe cool yeah, I'm joining the the tick talkers of the world too, and I'm goingto want my my I've got this little clip of the bring mid of Horizon Song that Iworked on last night. Actually that I'm going to launch a little ticktock videofor teasing out some of the some of the vocal performances on the new recordwith clips to try and build some buzz and build some some awareness of theJanus project kind of research. Now I'm looking forward to it cool coons, goodman, we o much yea. I really appreciate it taking time I er day to speak withus. It was awesome. I mean Ike drew thanks back, go with everything, soyeah a right, bights.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (52)